Siegfried

Date: June 21 – 26, 2011 (second of three Cycles)
Conductor: Donald Runnicles
Production: Francesca Zambello
Location: War Memorial, San Francisco.

Jay Hunter Morris was not expected to sing in this production. As the cover for Ian Storey, the original two-evening Siegfried, Morris was supposed to stand by and be ready if Ian Storey became indisposed. But such a call up came a few months early, at a rehearsal in March of this year, when Storey decided he was not ready for the first evening’s duties. Morris, debuting the role, came through and, more importantly, showed nary a sign of exhaustion at the end.

Morris seemed to have skimmed through some of the high notes at his entrance, and noticeably saved firepower for the long evening. As the evening progressed, he opened up poco a poco, culminating with his duet with Nina Stemme’s well-rested and full-powered Brünnhilde in his final scene. While his voice sounded somewhat pinched, he made up with pitch and rhythmic precision. By the third Act, his voice opened up ably and, without sounding fatigued, produced a suave, sweet sound with the sort of vivacity not commonly found at the fourth (or fifth!) hour of most Siegfrieds. His golden blond hair looked like Neil Robertson’s on an explosive hair day. After five hours of him, he simply looked like the boyish-looking snooker star’s twin brother! Under a radiating charm and plenty of youthful energy hid a boyish tenderness that compelled the audience to dish out parental forgiveness, even as his character was this disrespectful, ungrateful brat.

Stacey Tappan delivered one fine forest bird: her voice was tender and playful but without so much trill as to kill the role. Her portrayal of the feathered animal in human costumes was slightly more problematic. Costume designer Catherine Zuber dressed Tappan in a radiant burgundy orange dress, into this Eva Marie Saint lookalike. However, her humanized presence, even if merely figurative as she led Siegfried to Brünnhilde, somewhat negated the logic of Siegfried’s interjection as he first discovered Brünnhilde. Ronnita Miller’s Erda provided dramatic heft with her arresting stage presence and her secure vocal athleticism. David Cangelosi’s Mime was more vocally penetrating than Morris’ Siegfried, but dramatically didn’t inhabit the role as much as Morris did. While Cangelosi worked some of the mandatory squealing and wheeling into the role, his portrayal was rather bland and unremarkable as compared with other contemporary Mimes such as Wolfgang Schmidt at Bayreuth and Herwig Pecoraro in Vienna. If anything, his singing felt like a butcher working on a carcass with professional speed and adequacy, albeit with neither dramatic fanfare nor excitement.

Delavan improved further as Wotan. Vocally, his voice was penetrating and fearsome. Theatrically, he seemed more comfortable portraying a God in decline than as the ruler of all Gods in the previous evenings.

Fafner’s cave was set in an abandoned factory. The dragon appeared as a huge, tank-like machinery with flat claws that were imposing in size but looked practically harmless. Gordon Hawkins’ Alberich wore a pair of infrared goggles as he waited for his opportunity. Jan Hartley’s projections continued to daze and awe, and gave much context to the impending decline of the status quo. Deforestation, trains loaded with timber, overstretched electricity grid were some of the projected images that served to bolster two of the central themes – environmentalism and the cost of greed – of this American Ring. The Act III stage in Die Walküre  was transformed into a ruinous rock pile, suggesting that Zambello was ready to highlight the passing of time and more importantly, the degeneration of the world outside it. While that seemed to be a deviation of Wagner’s intent (the circle of flame in my opinion was supposed to surround and protect Brünnhilde in perpetuity, impenetrable to the effects of the passing of time), the dramatic outcome of such deviation seemed to tuck neatly into Zambello’s vision of gradual decay and impending downfall.

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2 comments on “Siegfried

  1. natalie1978 says:

    like Neil Robertson’s on an explosive hair day…LOL

  2. TFS says:

    yeah Morris’ hair is wickedly awesome!

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