Chamber music and recital

Padmore/Wigglesworth/Cook: Schumann, Janáček

Date: April 4, 2018
Location: Kammermusiksaal at the Philharmonie, Berlin.

Schumann – Liederkreis Op. 39
Wiggleworth – Echo and Narcissus
Janáček – Zápisník zmizelého (The Diary of One Who Disappeared)

Mark Padmore, tenor
Ryan Wigglesworth, piano
Allison Cook, mezzo-soprano
Members of the Vocalconsort Berlin

Echo and Narcissus: A Dramatic Cantata is Ryan Wiggleworth’s setting of the Narcissus poem from Ted Hughes’ Tales from Ovid. The piece is a perfect companion to Janáček’s The Diary of One, set to the text by Ozef Kalda, not least because Wiggleworth’s inspiration for the format of his work came from Janáček’s – a musical setting with a male voice as chief protagonist, a female voice as narrator, piano and an off-stage female choir in mind. Both pieces also tell the story of a man falling for the beauty of another (for Narcissus, the reflection of himself), enchanted in part by the glitter of the eyes: “He could not believe / The beauty of those eyes / That gazed into his own” (Hughes); “Pohledla po mně zhluboka / pak vznesla sa přes peň / a tak mi v hlavě ostala / přes celučký, celučký deň. (With searching eyes she looked at me / then swift as a bird flew / but left me yearning after her / for all that day, all that day through.)” (Kalda). Both men bid farewell to a land where their lives begin, but this is where the comparison ends: Wigglesworth’s ending is chilling, as if all lights around us are dimming to an eternal darkness. Janáček’s treatment is more upbeat, as the protagonist bids farewell with a new chapter of life already in mind – after all, he clearly knows he is eloping with his temptress Zefka. Where Janáček’s colorations ebb and flow, Wigglesworth’s palette is decidedly more somber. His piece ends with Mark Padmore repeating the word “farewell”, in a slow diminuendo and with two syllables in a descending semi-tone. The counterpoint is the off-stage chorus (situated at the back of audience balcony) repeating the same words in an eerie pattern of ascending harmonic progression. Wigglesworth’s writing here is simple, elegant, but dramatically effective, and I wish this work could find a place in the standard repertoire. Mark Padmore never over-dramatized (in contrast to Ian Bostridge’s; see earlier review here), but elucidated his lines clearly, with conviction and utmost reverence. This kind of treatment was particularly evident in Schumann, where his delivery flowed with conversational beauty, without the sort of overt, let-me-tell-you-something sort of didacticism prevalent with some of the more lieder recitalists today. His on-stage demeanor gave the effect of letting the voice and words speak for themselves, and he was merely a conduit between us the audience and the composition. Allison Cook was a fine singer who mustered different timbres as she cycled through bursts of singing, narrating, and whispering. Ryan Wigglesworth had a fine touch and sensibility on the keys. His prolonged pedaling of the final chord in Janáček punctuated the protagonist’s exhilaration, as if to reflect upon the more somber Schumann and Wigglesworth that came before.

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Chamber music and recital

Haochen Zhang: Recital

Date: December 12, 2015
Location: Grand Hall, Lee Shau Kee Lecture Centre, The University of Hong Kong.

Janáček – From the Street
Schumann – Kreisleriana Op. 16
Beethoven – Sonata No. 26 in E-flat major, Op. 81a, Les adieux
Scriabin – Poèmes, Op. 69 No. 1 & 2, 32 No. 1
Ginastera – Piano Sonata No. 1, Op. 22

ENCORES

Mozart – Rondo alla turca (arr. Volodos)
Brahms – Intermezzo No. 2 in A major

Haochen Zhang (piano)

One would assume that Haochen Zhang, who studied under Gary Graffman at Curtis, would perform with the sort of exuberant showmanship and unrestrained virtuosity that often define the performing style of Graffman’s other two star pupils from China, Lang Lang and Yuja Wang. That would have been fine, to be sure, as plenty of people are willing and happy to buy tickets to witness the perfect execution of that performing style. In this winter evening at HKU, Zhang offered a similar stomping execution, and then some. There were moments when Zhang flashed with more superficial thrills than musical sensibility, and there were other moments when tempo was modified more for frivolous excitement than for phrasal cohesion. For the better part of the evening, however, Zhang seemed singularly focused on slowly and tastefully unveiling each composer’s music, with audible evidence where he deferred to each composer’s dynamic and tempo signatures, especially in Kreisleriana and Les adieux. With Kreisleriana, Zhang collated various passages, each depicting a varying personality of Schumann’s subject matter (that would be Hoffmann’s Kreisler), with a kaleidoscopic alteration of texture. In Les adieux, Zhang provided a compelling contrast between the lyrical Abwesenheit and the more sonorous Das Wiedersehen. Whereas Lang and Wang often seem to treat the piano as an interpretive intermediary, Zhang’s approach to the keyboard this evening seemed more symbiotic, as if there is equal significance, and substance, between a willing pianist and a willing instrument. Here, the Steinway & Sons concert grand produced a gorgeous sound, with crisp tones at the upper registers and a steely support at the lower registers. Curiously, the middle sections got muffled up, especially on pedals in the Janáček. One would assume that to be an odd characteristic of the instrument. On more attentive listening, this peculiarity could (possibly?) be explained by Zhang’s tendency to overlap his transiting chords under pedal, which created a momentary whiff of cloudiness which then led to a muffling sensation. This overlap would create an incredible audible effect in dreamy music, but the non-linearity could irritate some. Elsewhere, the Beethoven could have sounded less like Rachmaninoff and more like, let’s say, Beethoven, but overall, Zhang’s meticulous and analytical effort paid off with a desirably practical amount of sincerity and authenticity. In the Ginastera, Zhang curtailed some of that analytical rendition and permeated the air with a more relaxed spontaneity. The choices for his three encores: Rondo alla turca a la Volodos, Brahms’ Intermezzo No. 2 in A major and a short Mozart sonata segment revealed not nearly as much technical notoriety as a strategy and desire to earn a reputation as a pianist with, more than just showmanship and virtuosity, a varied and versatile repertoire.

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Chamber music and recital, Orchestral music

Scottish Chamber/Pires: Chopin, Beethoven

Date: February 20 & 21, 2014
Location: Hong Kong Cultural Centre, Hong Kong.

Scottish Chamber Orchestra
Robin Ticciati, conductor
Maria João Pires, piano

In two concerts during the Arts Festival, the Hong Kong audience had a chance to hear Lisboeta pianist Maria João Pires play two concertos with the Scottish Chamber Orchestra: Schumann (Op. 54), and Chopin No. 2 (Op. 21). In the first concert, Pires committed herself with measured eloquence, and showed no signs of impatience in unveiling Schumann’s melodic fabric in a slow but sure fashion. In both opening and final movements, her playing infused an aura of nobility and grandeur in the concert hall, though at times her generous pedal work obscured some fine details, especially in those book-ending movements. In the second concert, Chopin’s tricky fingering did not faze the 69-year-old pianist, who delighted with a sympathetic, almost cerebral insight to the piece. Pires’ articulation, unruffled and full of small details and ideas, would easily earn the composer’s approval. That said, Pires seemed just short of providing a requisite level of emotive fervor and broad dynamic range demanded by the piece, especially in the all-hell-breaks-loose Allegro vivace movement. On balance, Pires remains a world-class pianist despite her age, but the choice of the Chopin was less than desirable. Perhaps the Hong Kong audience would be better served with the sort of Schubert and Brahms chamber works – well featured in Pires’ recent recordings with DG – that are more appropriate at this stage in her career. Also programmed in the two concerts were two symphonies: Schumann No. 2 and Beethoven No. 5. The chamber group as a whole was careful with detailing. The first bassoon could have been less dynamically protruding, especially during the Beethoven, but overall the musicians did fine under Robin Ticciati’s animated conducting. The Glyndebourne director-designate’s arm movements, vivid with broad motions, were exciting and fun to watch. The baroque horns (in the Beethoven) had a few dirty moments, but when the archaic instruments were in control, they gave the sort of regal spaciousness and metallic splendor that regular French horns could not easily reproduce.

Maria João Pires with the Scottish Chamber Orchestra.

Maria João Pires with the Scottish Chamber Orchestra. (Photo credit: HK Arts Festival website)

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